Nov 242018
 

Chicken Soup for a Sick Scene and Sequel A Tool to Engage Your Audience

I love family stories. Remember sitting around the table, telling stories, often the same stories year after year. It doesn’t matter what you’re writing–it can be a historical thriller or a book for your family. Chicken Soup story is a good way to study and practice writing a scene and sequel. If you sell your story at www.ChickenSoup.com, that’s great. If not, you have a great chapter for your family book.  If you do sell it, you’re $200 richer. Have a question?  Leave a comment.

 If you teach writing to children check out the games in Teach Writing Without a Pencil

Lesson One

What is a Scene? 

  • That’s easy…

  • There’s 3 in a play…

  • It’s something you paint or take a picture of…

  • It’s what your child creates at your mother-in-law’s dinner party

A scene is the major part of a story.

  • A story is a narrative of events, a recounting of something that’s happened—either in the real world or in the fictional world.

 

Like a Play

 

 

  • A play can be broken up into three acts: beginning, middle, and end. The beginning is the setup, it creates the tension. The middle of the scene builds up and intensifies even more. The ending breaks down into two parts: climax and resolution.

Acts are broken down into scenes

Scene

  • Something you paint or photograph

  • You don’t tell about a scene

  • You have to show it.

  • Practice

A girl sits by her father. He slumps to the ground. He dies. She cries believes her life is over.

Telling vs showing.

  • A scene is a conflict lived through by character and reader. Dwight Swain says that there are two functions of a scene –

  • To provide interest and

  • To move your story forward.

A scene can:

  • Can raise a question to intrigue your reader

  • Can be used to build characterization.

  • Can provide information.

  • But it always moves the story along

How long is a scene?

  • Swain says that time holds a scene together. A character lives through a scene, and there are no breaks in the flow of life.

  • A teenager arrives at Prom. He dances with the girl of his. When he stumbles on her dress, they fall. He leaves and the scene is over. 

Remember

  • Use action verbs

  • Keep the internal thought to a minimum

  • Use a great deal of dialogue if possible. Dialogue is a nifty way to show how people feel without telling the reader.

Construct a scene of something in your life.

Feel free to post it and I’ll give you an edit on it.

Chicken Soup asking for stories here…

 

 

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